1920 Antwerp Olympic Games

Top Medal Winners – Countries

     Country              G   S   B   Total   
 1.  USA                 41  27  28    96       
 2.  Sweden              19  20  24    63
 3.  Great Britain       15  15  13    43
 4.  France               9  19  13    41
 5.  Belgium             14  11  10    35
 6.  Finland             15  10   9    34
 7.  Norway              13   7   8    28
 8.  Italy               13   5   5    23
 9.  Denmark              3   9   1    13
10.  Netherlands          4   2   5    11
12.  Switzerland          2   2   7    11
13.  South Africa         3   4   3    10
14.  Canada               3   3   3     9
15.  Brazil               1   1   1     3
16.  Estonia              1   2   0     3
17.  Australia            0   2   1     3
18.  Spain                0   2   0     2
19.  Czechoslovakia       0   0   2     2
20.  Japan                0   2   0     2
21.  Greece               0   1   0     1
22.  New zealand          0   0   1     1
23.  Luxembourg           0   1   0     1

Outstanding Athletes

Athlete, Country               Sport-Men                  G   S    B  Total
  • Willis Lee, U.S.A. Shooting 5 1 1 7
  • Nedo Nadi, Italy Fencing 5 – – 5
  • Hubert van Innis, Belgium Archery 4 2 – 6
  • Lloyd Spooner, U.S.A. Shooting 4 1 2 7
  • Carl Osburn, U.S.A. Shooting 4 1 1 6
  • Otto Olsen, Norway Shooting 3 2 – 5
  • Larry Nuesslein, U.S.A. Shooting 2 1 2 5
  • Julien Brule,France Archery 1 3 1 5
  • Dennis Fenton, U.S.A. Shooting 3 – 1 4
  • Aldo Nadi, Italy Fencing 3 1 – 4
  • Paavo Nurmi, FIN Athletics 3 1 – 4
  • Harold Natvig, Norway Shooting 2 1 1 4
  • Osten Ostensen, Norway Shooting – 2 2 4
  • Erik Backman, SWE Athletics – 1 3 4
  • Fritz Kuchen, SWI Shooting – – 4 4
  • Norman Ross, U.S.A. Swimming 3 – – 3
  • Albert Hill, Britan Athletics 2 1 – 3
  • Morris Kirksey, U.S.A. Rugby 2 1 – 3
  • Charley Paddock, U.S.A. Athletics 2 1 – 3
  • Bevil Rudd, SAF Athletics 1 – 2 3
  • Ettore Caffaratti, Italy Equestrian – 1 2 3Athlete, Country Sport-Women G S B Total
  • Ethelda Bleibtrey, U.S.A. Swimming 3 – – 3
  • Suzanne Lenglen,France Tennis 2 – 1 3
  • Kitty McKane,Britan Tennis 1 1 1 3
  • Frances Schroth, U.S.A. Swimming 1 – 2 3
  • Irene Guest, U.S.A. Swimming 1 1 – 2
  • Margaret Woodbridge, U.S.A. Swimming 1 1 – 2
  • Dorothy Holman, GBR Tennis – 2 – 2
  • Date of Competition: 7 July to 12 September.
    (Figure Skating & Ice Hockey: 23-29 April.
    Official Opening Ceremony: 14 August.)
  • Attendance: 29 nations
  • Participants: 2668
  • Male athletes: 2,591
  • Female athletes: 77
  • Sports: 21
  • Events: 154
  • Most-medaled country: U.S. (96)
  • Hockey makes its first Olympic appearance.
    Great Britian takes the Gold.
    Denmark & Belgium take the silver & bronze respectively.
  • A new Olympic flag is designed — five interlocking rings on
    a white background. The rings represent the continents of Africa,
    Asia, Australia, Europe and North and South America.
Statistics

History

The sixth Olympiad which was scheduled to take place in Berlin, in 1916 was interrupted by World War I.

Some members of the IOC pressured Coubertin to move the Olympics to a country which was not involved in the conflict. Coubertin refused as he thought that war might be averted if the Olympic Games were given to Berlin. Unfortunately this did not prove the case.

The VII Olympics were awarded to Antwerp, Belgium,(a symbolic choice) as compensation for the sufferings of the Belgians during World War I. Austria, Bulgaria, Germany, Hungary and Turkey – the Central Powers – were not permitted to participate in these Games. Still, 29 countries (including the newly independent Czechoslovakia, Estonia and Finland) took part. And a record number of athletes – 2600 , attended.

The organisation of the games was by no means an easy task. There was a great deal of re-building to be done. Attendance was poor and the Games were not well documented.

Accomodation was inadequate – athletes slept in cots in school rooms. However most athletes accepted the lack of facilities with good grace.

The United States won the most medals, including 41 gold.
The 100 metres was won by world record holder
Charlie Paddock(US).He also won gold in the 4x100m
relay.
Click on the image on the left for an enlargement of
Charles Paddock winning the 100m.

 

Finland also performed well in the weight competitions and the javelin
and finished first and second in shot-put and discus respectively.

In the pole vault, the United States’ Frank Foss won the gold clearing the height of 13 feet 5 inches,
or 4.09 metres. Here, on the left he gracefully clears the pole.

This left only two teams to contest the competition: those from the USA & France. The French were still suffering from the losses of World War I.

And in swimming, the U.S. won 11 of 15 events, led by triple gold medalists
Norman Ross and Ethelda Bleibtrey
(who won both individual swimming events and swam on
the champion 400-metre relay team).Defending men’s 100-metre freestyle champion
Duke Kahanamoku (won two gold medals in men’s swimming)
and 14-year-old springboard diving
champion Aileen Riggin (the first gold medalist in women’s springboard
diving) were two other stars in the US swim team. Four years later, Aileen became the first, and only one to win both swimming
and diving medals . She won silver in the
springboard diving in Paris , and also came third in the 100m backstroke.

In rowing, the competitors in the single sculls event were Jack Beresford (Great Britain)
and John B. Kelly of the US. Kelly (the father of the late actress-princess Grace Kelly),narrowly beat Beresford for the gold medal. Half an hour later, he also won the doubles sculls final with Paul V. Costello.

Two important features were added to the Olympic tradition. These were the Olympic flag and the Olympic oath.

The design of the flag consisted of five interlocking rings – to represent the 5 continents -Australia, Europe, Asia, Africa & America. The rings were black, blue, green, red and yellow.

The flag of every nation competing in the games has at least one of these colours. The first person to utter the Olympic oath was Victor Bion, a Belgian fencer and water-polo player.

This oath is taken by a representative of the host nation, on behalf of all competitors, pledging to participate in the Games in the ‘true spirit of sportmanship’.

Australia in the 1920 Antwerp Olympic Games

Gold

ZERO

Silver

  • 3000m walk : George Parker
  • Swimming-4 x 200m freestyle relay :
    Frank Beaurepaire, Harry Hay, William
    Herald & Ivan Stedman.

    Bronze

  • Swimming-1500m freestyle : Frank Beaurepaire.(Unfortunately, Fanny Durack was unable to defend the
    100m freestyle title she had won at the Stockholn Olympics.
    She suffered appendicitis and pneumonia shortly before she was due to leave for Europe.
    She later contracted typhoid and was forced to retire )

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